WASHINGTON (AP) — Because of the coronavirus pandemic the Supreme Court is holding arguments by phone for the first time in its 230-year history. Attorneys say the teleconference arguments in 10 cases over six days present a range of challenges. They can’t see the justices’ nods, frowns and hand gestures. But there are also opportunities. Justices have long said that the written briefs lawyers submit are vastly more important to the cases’ outcomes than what’s said in court. But the arguments also help them resolve nagging issues and occasionally can change a justice’s vote.